Why Ludum Dare was the best.

Last weekend I took part in a fairly well known 48 hour game jam called Ludum Dare. I love rapid game development and being challenged by themes and restrictions but have never really had the opportunity to take part until now. It was very fun.

One of my motivations for entering was to try and make something a bit different from my previous games. I was hoping that because LD games have to conform to a ‘theme’ at each event, this forced restriction would make me come up with something totally new and as different from Another Perspective as possible. You might imagine then that the voted theme for Ludum Dare 30 ended up being a little disappointing for me specifically. Having just released a game on Steam about changing characters and perspectives and solving puzzles using multiple connected worlds; I was now faced with quickly coming up with and building a game that must fit the theme of: Connected Worlds.

There’s a lot I could say about the development process for the game I made, what went well, what didn’t, what decisions I made and why, but that’s another story for another time. While the experience of making and finishing a game in 48 hours (while livestreaming the whole thing) was fantastic in its own right, there’s something else about taking part in LD that ensured I will be taking part in as many of these events as I can until the end of time. The community.

Making a game in 48 hours is incredibly hard. A lot of people don’t finish. Almost nobody finishes everything they wanted to build and it can take upwards of 10 hours for some just to settle on a game idea and get going. This is stressful. But for me, all of that stress would always subside just by hanging around the IRC channel. Seeing everyone going through all of the same emotional madness (and also having all the same crazy fun) that I was. Everyone there is a developer taking part. The chat was always filled with an incredible amount of support, camaraderie, advice and common emotional ground to be had. Not only that, but people in the community frequently offer up code libraries, plugins, middleware and amazing tools (such as the totally awesome sfxr) to help other developers taking part.

After the competition ends, games are rated and judged and people can play games and leave comments. Importantly, the games can only be rated by other developers that submitted a game. The result of such a simple rule is something beautiful. I have never in my life seen a more positive, and supportive response to such a large and massively varied collection of amateur creative works. The amount of positive comments, really thoughtful and detailed constructive feedback, and appreciation shown for every developer just for having taken part was absolutely staggering. And the reasons why were obvious. Every single person who plays your game, who leaves a comment, and rates your work was also just faced with the challenge of making a video game in 48 hours. They completely understand the restrictions you faced and they know all too well the challenges, pains and mind melting stress of taking part, and of actually finishing a game.

In an ocean of games where the developers often ran out of time to build feature X, or where the graphics are only half done, levels are broken, glitches are everywhere, tutorials are rushed in or sometimes entirely absent, and difficulty and balance tuning are all over the place; I’ve never seen so many people rush to give positive encouragement. To talk about how cool your idea was, how much they like where the game is heading, and give advice on where the developer could take the game next. It was incredible. It was like some kind of comment utopia where mankind had learned completely what was actually important, useful and awesome about discussing creative works. I’m sure there may have been exceptions but I really didn’t see anything negative, or toxic across all the games I played and rated myself. (And I’m not done playing and rating, there’s been so much cool stuff made and playing these things is awesome and inspiring.)

After a week of very depressing news in the world of video games where comments and social media are concerned; I’m so, so happy to have taken part in something so completely awesome with the exact opposite vibe. Filled with people who love to make games. Filled with people who all want to see one another succeed. Filled with people who don’t care who you are, or where you come from, because they’re only interested in what you create. This is what games should be about. And I could not be more proud to have been a part of such a totally bad ass community.

Another Perspective – Launching on Steam!

So a few months ago my game Another Perspective was greenlit on Steam. This week it’s (finally) getting released! I made an exciting new trailer for the Steam launch so that everyone else can be just as excited about all the excitement:

As mentioned in the trailer there’s some new stuff although a lot of it is polish. All of the features from 1.2 like windowed mode, fullscreen and believing in your Dreams™ are ofcourse included along with a few new little things. Some extra levels have been sneaked in with a few little changes and corrections here or there (largely in Mystery mode) and there’s eight fun Steam achievements and a couple of new secrets to find. There’s also localization for a few languages that some cool people volunteered to help me out with. Not all of them will be in the game for release, but they will get added to the game one by one once the game is out.

The game is out on Friday August 8th, 5pm PDT (which is August 9th technically in Europe, so you can buy it when you wake up!) If you’ve already bought the game before you do not need to buy it again. As I’ll be trying to make sure that everyone who has bought the game from my site, desura, itch.io, etc will get a Steam key for the game. If you feel like buying it again anyway though I am definitely not going to stop you.

This is probably the final ‘major’ update to the game as I really want to move on to new projects. I’ve had a bit of a ‘never finished’ disease with this game and even to this day there’s still a lot of ways in which I feel the game is flawed or could be made into something more, but I’m at the point where I’d rather build a whole new, better product from scratch. Rather than keep trying to lift this game up to meet ever increasing standards, because I could do that forever and be just as trapped in a maze of dark clouds, doors, keys, text and bricks as the character is.

I’m very excited about simply releasing something on Steam. It’s a pretty big milestone for me even with so many other titles getting greenlit these days.  We don’t live in an age where ‘out on Steam’ is synonymous with financial success anymore, but thankfully my tutorial content and patreon are starting to free me up to care more about people experiencing the game than people buying it to keep me alive. Which is a pretty cool place to be.

-S

The stuff nobody notices, but is still totally worth it.

[spoilers about Another Perspective to follow]

When I made Another Perspective I tried really hard to theme it in a particular way. A lot of the game’s story is about identity. What it means to be a video game character or a ‘fictional’ character in general. That ‘story’ and idea is ofcourse wrapped underneath the mental challenges of a puzzle game, which is the first thing most people playing the game are interested in. I could go into depth about how I came up with the story and what it means to me but that’s a whole article in itself. What I want to talk about here is some of the things I did to try and convey specific ideas and how a lot of them ended up not so much being “mis-interpreted” but simply not interpreted at all.

Now don’t get me wrong, I don’t see this as some sort of huge failing on my part. Every game and piece of art in general is coated with details that nobody notices or seems to care about. Things that often took a ton of work too.

It’s interesting to me to think about though, because even though it seems from an objective view that some of these things were a waste of time; I still don’t see myself doing the game differently if I went back and made it again*. Because there’s something about adding in dumb stuff that nobody will notice that’s insanely exciting to me. Because every now and again, one person notices and it resonates with them in a powerful way and makes everything completely worth it.

Even if it doesn’t exactly equate to more sales.

That said I want to share some of these things with the people that didn’t notice them. So if you’ve already played the game to it’s completion, here are some fun details you might not have noticed. If you haven’t, don’t spoil yourself! Or do. Up to you really.

[SPOILERS START HERE]

  • When you pass through a door in the game, the screen fades to black and the next level fades in. The player character however, never actually fades out. He’s always visible no matter what and never actually leaves the screen**. He enters each new level exactly where he left the last level. This was important to me to create this sense of an unbroken stream of consciousness. No distracting ‘blink’ of him leaving the screen while the level changes only to catch up with him in the next level. You’re always with him. The only breaks being when you “shift” characters. Making this mechanic the only focus of the questions surrounding the character’s identity. I like to think this one works on a sub-concious level even though conciously most players say they never noticed it at all when it’s pointed out to them. Or at least I hope so. Because it had a monstrous effect on level design***.
  • Whenever you shift character, the moving fog in the background changes direction. Actually, quite a few players notice this one and tend to feel quite smart/satisfied when they do so and are eager to point it out. Which is really cool and feels awesome to me when they do.  This one is quite a simple reflection of the idea that you’re seeing the world from a new perspective and that things are different/opposite now. Working in tandem with the text/personality shifts/opposites that often occur when you shift.
  • There are two, separate trailers for the game. They’re very similarly named and are very similar in content. This was supposed to reflect a lot of what the game is about, in that with a seemingly minor change, everything can come across differently while appearing mostly the same. The first trailer was titled “Official Trailer: Another Perspective” and the second was titled “Another Perspective: Official Trailer“. The trailers involve two “voices” describing the game and what it’s about in a slightly different manner. The voices instantly swap whenever the gameplay shows a character shift. One of the voices is me, the developer, talking very strictly and excitedly about the game and the other is represents an unknown person described only as “Shaun’s friend” talking about the game, seeming more confused and uncertain about what it actually is. Each voice has a complete script that is cut into chunks and matched with chunks of the other voice to form two scripts. One for each trailer. If you really wanted to you could put the parts back together from both trailers to get the complete dialogue for each voice. If you want to see what that looks like, here’s the complete original script. Most people don’t even notice there are two trailers let alone all this extra nonsense. I think a lot of that comes down to how I named them, trying to be to clever for my own good and not being clear enough about what I was trying to do. But I still like how it exists today all the same.
  • In the ending for the game[seriously, spoilers.], you end up walking on the outside of old levels. With the walls existing where there was space and space existing where there was wall. This is hinted to by the sillhouettes of characters and keys and doors in specific places that they were in before. This was done to reflect the idea there was a completely opposite conclusion to draw about the character’s identity and meaning. It also neatly conveys the idea of now existing “outside of the box”, as most levels had kept him inside walls. This is also the only part of the game where text is drawn on to the wall surfaces as opposed to floating in the air around the player. The ending was all about creating a sense of oneness. A lot of players though, spend a lot of time trying to reach the ‘key’ sillhouettes on the wall thinking they’re an item or secret. Understandable given they look similar to ‘phased out’ keys earlier in the game.
  • Half way through the game there is a second music track that plays. This track is actually just the first track played backwards. Literally. No other editing was done I just reversed the main theme of the game. It actually had a totally perfect effect as while the start of the game conveys a lot of mystery, but in a curious kind of way. Later in the game the mood gets kind of unsettling, confused and distressed. Backwards piano notes add to this mood quite well because of how unnatural and odd they sound.

Theres a few other things too, but you get the idea. A lot of the stuff I’m actually most proud of in this game is the stuff nobody ever particularly notices. Which is a very strange way of thinking and I’m not sure is one that is conducive to me ever making a profit. Haha.

OH WELL. VIDEO GAMES.

*Actually there’s a lot I’d do differently, but not in the sense of “not doing stuff like this” rather than making it more visible and drawing more attention to it.

**Except when you fall out of the screen or restart the level.

***Every level had to have the player start where he left the last level. This made it really hard to move the order of levels around whenever I wanted which was a big pain. It also made it hard to create certain styles or themes of level wherever I wanted. I had to get creative a lot of the time. Levels often end with big pits/falls before the door, or big climbs/stairways. This is often done just to set up the next level.

Another Perspective PC launch!

It’s out! It’s out! Finally releasing Another Perspective into the wild. You can learn more about the game on it’s official launch page. Then if you are so inclined you can choose to purchase it for the price of five american dollars. You can even purchase the game right here in this blog post! Does technology know no bounds!?


If you have any technical issues with the game feel free to contact me at shaun.spalding@gmail.com and I will do my best to help out. If you are press and would like to know lots of useful information about the game or request a press copy among other exciting things, visit my presskit page!

What’s a ‘Gamer’?

I feel like the vast majority of this is stating-the-obvious stuff. But I think sometimes words change without people realizing it and it’s time we all tried to get on the same page.

Being involved in games tends to mean a lot of reading and hearing about the word ‘gamer’ in a near infinite number of different contexts. More recently however, I’ve been reading and hearing a lot of different opinions and stances on the word gamer itself. Or the collective that they imagine ‘gamers’ to be.

The problem is that the only useful, established and well understood meaning of the word ‘gamer’ (being someone who plays games) has become one of the most useless ways of describing a person there is. The people that fall into the category of “playing games” is so vast and huge that it’s barely any more useful than the category of people who “watch films” or “listen to music”. There’s next to nothing you can learn about a person when you’re told they play games.

So when I hear opinions like “I really dislike modern gamers”, “I don’t think of myself as a gamer anymore these days”, “such and such is not a real gamer” or “this and that is designed for gamers” I’m always left trying to work out who it is you’re actually talking about. What does being a gamer entail to these people? Because their opinion on “all people who play video games, ever” is almost never what these people are actually trying to express.

You could say something like “Well when I say gamer, I’m talking about people who are really invested in video games, are big fans and play all kinds of video games.” but not only is such a description really vague and subjective, (what counts as qualifying for ‘true gamer’ status is as ill defined and full of one-upmanship as the hypothetical contest for being a ‘true star trek fan’) but the culture you’re describing won’t match up to someone else’s vision of the word. You’re going to cause misunderstandings.

Sure I could (and probably would) say this about any noun that tries to describe a collective of people united under some kind of vague or widely interpreted culture. Like trying to define religious or political groups. But ‘enjoyment of video games’ has grown so widespread that the problem has gotten a little bit ridiculous, and it’s because it’s grown so much that the problem came to be. Ten years ago, if two people were ‘gamers’ in the sense that they enjoyed playing video games at all, then it was much easier to say for sure that they had some kind of shared interest. The number of games, genres and platforms that existed were relatively small, gaming wasn’t as accessible, or as accepted. It was a niche for nerds, who would sometimes feel forced to hide their interest in games from others. Back when in-joke stuff like this was being released. (and was awesome! shout outs to everyone from the Pure Pwnage era, you are totally My People.)

But ‘gaming’ isn’t really like that at all anymore. Sure this subculture still exists but it’s no longer useful or intuitive to describe it with the word gamer by itself. The problem stems from the fact that It didn’t use to be a subculture, it was the culture full stop. But now it isn’t. And that’s not a bad thing. It feels absolutely awesome to have been a part of something that has grown so massively and quickly. To have witnessed a niche grow, change, spread and evolve into worldwide appeal and to be able to continue to watch and help it to grow further today. We have league of legends tournaments being shown in bars now! We have arrived. But this community is now far too large and all encompassingly fantastic to be sweepingly described anymore. Having an “opinion on gamers” is like having an opinion on “people who go to the cinema”, “blue eyed people” or “women”. My own brand of “interest in games” is worlds apart from the next person who has one. The medium is just too enormous. There’s no need for me to try and safeguard the word gamer as if it’s somehow vital for the “protection” of my old-school gaming subculture.

These days if I tell someone I’m into games and they respond that they like games too I feel a little bit like we both just told one another that we liked listening to music. Sure there’s potentially shared interests, especially from my position as a game designer. But you’d have tell one another what bands/games you liked for the information to actually be useful.

So who are you talking about when you say gamer? What do you mean when you say that you are/aren’t one or when you say what you think of them? Try and think if there’s a better word to describe what you’re trying to express because you’re all confusing the life out of me.

“RPG Fans annoy the crap out of me” “I love the Fighting Game community!” “the 18-24 year old major console demographic gets on my nerves” are all sweeping statements but at least I have some place to start when it comes to understanding your opinion. Narrowing down from “I think X about everyone alive today playing games.” is more than a little bit impossible. There’s no single word noun for someone who likes music (A ‘listener’?) so why do we still need one for games. It’s useless.

These days I tell people that I’m really into computer game design/game mechanics. This tends to be the best way to express that I have some level of professional interest in more or less everything across all genres and have a big history with games. I would agree to being a ‘gamer’ if asked but it wouldn’t tell you anything about me or my interests. And I certainly wouldn’t answer what I thought of “gamers” or even “gaming culture” without having to ask who or what you were talking about.

I won!

Those of you connected to me through some form of social media will have probably noticed by now that I won a competition and it’s some sort of big deal. So here’s the well overdue blog post about it and then I can get back to work!

won

Another Perspective, the remake of my 2011 game Perspective won the YoYo Games Win Big competition taking both the “Best New Game” award and first prize overall. This is really pretty awesome and I am super happy and totally mind blown by the result.

Another Perspective is a puzzle platform game with the very same concepts and ideas as Perspective. These concepts have then been taken further, mechanics and controls have been revamped and the game itself is of much higher quality overall. I was never happy with a lot of stuff that went into the first game and have wanted to remake Perspective for a very long time. So it’s fantastic to see that this work has paid off and the game is already doing well.

The game is actually only released on the Windows 8 store right now, I have not done anything to market the game although the competition win by itself has increased interest. I had to release the game on the store for the purposes of the competition, and planned to release the game on Windows 7 and Android immediately after the contest was over. However in light of the winning result I am adding further polish, content and tweaks to the game to prepare for a  super polished final Windows 7 release sometime in late October (I hope!). The android release will probably come some time after this but hopefully before Christmas.

In the mean time I’m going to be trying to actually market the game alongside development. Expect to hear lots more about it on the ramp up to the Windows 7 release!

For those who don’t know, I’ve been working as a game designer at Ubisoft Reflections for the past 2 years, however my contract there is coming to an end in October. While I’ve loved working with Reflections, I think most people who know me would agree that I’m an ‘indie developer at heart’. My plan has always been to try and strike out on my own and try to earn a living working on my own projects. The prize money from this competition has essentially funded me to do just that. This is why winning this competition is such a life changing moment for me, and I really could not be happier. I have the very real opportunity to just do what I love and I couldn’t be more thankful for it.

-S

Two Months Later

It’s been a long time since I posted anything, but not without good reason. A lot has gone on these past couple of months! More than I can really deal with in one blog post but I’ll try and summarize. First of all, I’m fully entered for the WinBig competition and I couldn’t really be happier about that. There were a lot of hurdles, certainly not the least of which was balancing dev time with a full time job.

I changed my original plan of developing a brand new game, to finally getting around to finishing the remake of Perspective. I’ve long felt that Perspective’s mechanics were only half explored, and that there was so much more I could do with the game that I never had the time, insight or skill to create back in early 2011.

So thus I’ve created Another Perspective.

Another Perspective

I promised myself a number of times I would never call the sequel something stupid like that, but it just turned out to be the best name. ‘Perspective 2′ didn’t really fit with what I considered a remake rather than a direct sequel, and as much as I wanted to avoid further confusion with a certain Digipen student game; “Perspective” was still the best word that summed up everything the game was about. And so, Another Perspective was born.

To be brief, it’s a complete remake of Perspective. A new story, more puzzles, more mechanics, better controls, better artwork (largely courtesy of Hannah Pretswell) better everything.

Working on this thing has totally thrown off my youtube videos. I haven’t put out any new content for 2 months, yet viewers and subscribers are still growing strong strangely enough. I’ll be looking to get back to those asap. Along with actually updating this blog.

Another Perspective is submitted for the competition, but isn’t directly released on Windows 7 and below just yet. I’ll be working towards that this month. More information about the game will be coming via this blog in the upcoming days.

-S

Game Maker: Studio – Windows 8 Competition

The past couple of months have been pretty dry for me in terms of doing new stuff. I’ve been making videos, but often missing my release schedule and generally not getting enough done outside of work. My day job is starting to get more taxing and it’s increasingly difficult to come home still motivated to work. This is the advantage of starting this kind of work early, in school or university where you have more free time than you know what to do with. If you’re trying to establish yourself independently while still needing the income support of a tiring day job it takes a tremendous amount of self motivation to be successful. When you commit an evening to independent work you’ve committed a whole day to work. It’s pretty unhealthy to never have that regular space available to relax, socialize and so on but where I’m at right now it’s still the strongest way to see results. Just not the easiest. Luckily what I do is pretty fun, or I’d basically have no chance at all.

So I saw this yesterday. Exciting stuff. I’m in. My last foray into a game dev contest ended with an unfinished game and a deep sense of self-disappointment. This time I’ve adjusted for my mistakes and will hopefully do a lot better. The conditions are generally more favourable. (It’s not Christmas, for a start.)

I have about 50 days to go from nothing, to approved on the windows store. I’ve worked out a brief schedule of how I’m going to do this. Technically I’m not starting from nothing, I’m picking up from the work I did on my December 2012 Steam contest entry that was never finished. I’ve reworked the design into something I’m confident can be completed to a quality bar I’m happy with in the time I have and all that remains is to build it.

I’ll be keeping a bit of a devblog here about the game’s progress, and putting a lot of other things in my life on hold to try and make the best of this entry. I’m really out to do well in this thing so it’s going to get all of my attention. I’ll also be trying to live stream some development of the game from my twitch channel.

That said I’ll still be trying to put out tutorial content over the coming weeks because I don’t want to risk the channel losing momentum. But other than that I’m really just going to be putting all my time and resources into this project.

Wish me luck!

February 2013 in review – Animex!

Turns out I kept a draft of this post and forgot to ever post it. It seems a bit late reviewing February 17 days into March, but regardless:

Animex. Animex was stupidly good. Animex is always stupidly good. Why weren’t you at Animex!? It was a surreal week. Over the past three years of Animex I’ve gone from being an eager student having his mind blown by all kinds of game wizardry, to being a graduate game designer taking a week off work to have his mind blown by all kinds of game wizardry, to getting invited to give a workshop to a lab full of students and play an actual role in the blowing of minds with game wizardry.

From the feedback I’ve had so far, it seems like the workshop went really well! I was terrified about the prospect of teaching anything live for weeks. I often have to re-record bits of my videos so I was a bit panicky about getting stuck in my own code while trying to demonstrate things. Luckily everything I actually presented worked. I had to spend a few minutes tinkering when helping individuals out with their own problems but that’s to be expected. I’m actually pretty satisfied with how I was able to think up approaches and solutions on the fly to stuff I’d never personally done before. That said, the advantage of starting so many projects throughout my life is that I tend to know at least one approach to pretty much everything these days.

There are too many other awesome things that happened at Animex to really cover. Alex Trowers has a pretty thorough summary over on his blog. It was fantastic. I go every year. I’ll keep going every year. You should go. Every year.

Actual game development work didn’t meet my goals for February but I’m getting back into actually working on games which is good. The problem is still that I’m dividing my time over too many different projects. I find it very difficult to work on one thing day after day. I’m really sick of not finishing and releasing things though.

February 2013 in review – YouTube

I have a lot of rambling to do about YouTube stuff so I’m splitting this monthly review into two parts this time around. Starting off with all the video things.

My YouTube progress is as strong as ever. My target for February was to hit 2000 subscribers. By midnight on the 28th I was at about 1950 and about one day into March I hit 2000. Given I didn’t think I’d get anywhere near my goal, I’d call that a big success. At the time of writing my YouTube channel currently has 2077 subscribers!

Time for some numbers and graphs, yay!

So my numbers are up a long way since January. My views per day across all videos is somewhere around 1450 on average. One of my goals in January was just to hit over 1000 per day so this has been going nowhere but up. I did a bit more free marketing for the channel by spreading links, bumping forum threads and also dropping another link on Reddit. This time to my In-Depth platformer tutorial. This link did a lot better than my last one, probably just because of the higher quality content. The main benefit I get from doing this kind of link spreading is new subscribers. The number of views I bring in from external sites is pretty negligible. Almost all of my significant traffic comes from YouTube searches, related videos and Google.

This tells me a few things; both about how to grow my channel effectively, and about the longevity of my content. Tutorial content will bring in a steady flow of traffic whilst there is a steady supply of people looking for the content. People have to actively be searching for Game Maker tutorials to find my videos, and have a real desire to learn the program in order to watch or subscribe. What this means is my content should bring in traffic until it becomes outdated, or GM is obsoleted/just drops out of use. It also means my traffic is capped at the number of people who exist at any one time who have the desire for this content and ability to access my videos. But I think this changing figure is much, much higher than the traffic I currently generate. Leaving me lots of room to grow.

I’m also bringing in very solid ad revenue ($147 this month) thanks both to increased views, and partnering my channel with a new ad network. The ads on my videos generate nearly 5 times the CPM I had been making from standard Adsense. So while again, the ad revenue was never the ultimate goal of this project, it’s now actually a fairly significant (and fully automatic) stream of income.

I’ve finally adopted a release schedule for my videos. I record tutorials on Sunday and upload them Monday evening. One tutorial a week, with potentially a bonus video that is not tutorial related. This firstly gives me some breathing room from trying to just push out content as quickly and as often as possible. Which I think will always see diminishing returns after two videos in a week. After the second video I upload in a week I feel like uploading any more just wastes content that could have been saved for later or spread more widely. It’s also important to produce content within the bounds of some kind of routine to prevent burn out, or even just drifting on to new projects. Secondly this helps my subscribers learn when to expect new content from me, helps them understand that I will regularly produce content and my channel feels more reliable. This should help keep the attention of my audience, as without a pattern or schedule, it’s easy for viewers to forget to check a channel for new content (as they don’t know when to expect it and when not to).

One of my ‘bonus videos’ this month was a design review of Perspective. Uploaded mostly as marketing for the game, this video did help boost sales somewhat but realistically I don’t think I’m ever likely to see significant profit from this iteration of the game. I personally see pushing the game as a practice marketing exercise. Seeing what works, and what doesn’t. That said, the small amount of revenue that Perspective brings in is still nice to have. It’s given me a lot of appreciation for the ‘Pay what you want’ model.

I’m in the process of updating my video thumbnails with text that is easier to read. Hopefully to give a boost to my related/suggested videos traffic. Thumbnails are overpowered. Never underestimate the strength of good video thumbnails. There’s a number of other polish touches I really want to put into my content when I get time. I worry that I’m starting to produce these videos by flowchart and I’ve stopped experimenting within the content itself. I need to keep improving!

‘Making Games’ has a lot of potential beyond what it has accomplished already. It’s important that I don’t get comfortable with its success so far and keep striving to make better content.
-S